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Circuit Analysis: Port Point of View
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1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.6 1.7 1.8 Introduction Circuit Elements SPICE Elements Circuit Laws Steady-State Circuits Network Theorems Two-Port Networks Instantaneous, Average, and RMS Values
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Semiconductor Diodes
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2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 2.6 2.7 2.8 2.9 2.10 Introduction The Ideal Diode Diode Terminal Characteristics The Diode SPICE Model Graphical Analysis Equivalent-Circuit Analysis Recti er Applications Waveform Filtering Clipping and Clamping Operations The Zener Diode
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Characteristics of Bipolar Junction Transistors
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3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 3.5 3.6 3.7 BJT Construction and Symbols Common-Base Terminal Characteristics Common-Emitter Terminal Characteristics BJT SPICE Model Current Relationships Bias and DC Load Lines Capacitors and AC Load Lines
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Characteristics of Field-Effect Transistors and Triodes 103
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4.1 Introduction 4.2 JFET Construction and Symbols 4.3 JFET Terminal Characteristics
103 103 103
Copyright 2002, 1988 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Click Here for Terms of Use.
4.4 4.5 4.6 4.7 4.8 4.9 4.10 4.11 4.12 JFET SPICE Model JFET Bias Line and Load Line Graphical Analysis for the JFET MOSFET Construction and Symbols MOSFET Terminal Characteristics MOSFET SPICE Model MOSFET Bias and Load Lines Triode Construction and Symbols Triode Terminal Characteristics and Bias
Contents
105 107 110 110 110 111 114 115 115
Transistor Bias Considerations
5.1 5.2 5.3 5.4 5.5 5.6 Introduction b Uncertainty and Temperature Effects in the BJT Stability Factor Analysis Nonlinear-Element Stabilization of BJT Circuits Q-Point-Bounded Bias for the FET Parameter Variation Analysis with SPICE
136 136 139 139 140 141
Small-Signal Midfrequency BJT Ampli ers
6.1 6.2 6.3 6.4 6.5 6.6 6.7 6.8 6.9 Introduction Hybrid-Parameter Models Tee-Equivalent Circuit Conversion of Parameters Measures of Ampli er Goodness CE Ampli er Analysis CB Ampli er Analysis CC Ampli er Analysis BJT Ampli er Analysis with SPICE
163 163 166 167 168 168 170 171 172
Small-Signal Midfrequency FET and Triode Ampli ers 200
7.1 7.2 7.3 7.4 7.5 7.6 7.7 Introduction Small-Signal Equivalent Circuits for the FET CS Ampli er Analysis CD Ampli er Analysis CG Ampli er Analysis FET Ampli er Gain Calculation with SPICE Graphical and Equivalent Circuit Analysis of Triode Ampli ers 200 200 201 202 203 203 205
Frequency Effects in Ampli ers
8.1 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.5 8.6 8.7 Introduction Bode Plots and Frequency Response Low-Frequency Effect of Bypass and Coupling Capacitors High-Frequency Hybrid- BJT Model High-Frequency FET Models Miller Capacitance Frequency Response Using SPICE
226 227 229 232 234 235 236
Contents
CHAPTER 9 Operational Ampli ers
9.1 9.2 9.3 9.4 9.5 9.6 9.7 9.8 9.9 9.10 9.11 9.12 Introduction Ideal and Practical OP Amps Inverting Ampli er Noninverting Ampli er Common-Mode Rejection Ratio Summer Ampli er Differentiating Ampli er Integrating Ampli er Logarithmic Ampli er Filter Applications Function Generators and Signal Conditioners SPICE Op Amp Model
258 258 259 260 260 261 262 262 263 264 264 265
Switched Mode Power Supplies
10.1 10.2 10.3 10.4 10.5 10.6 Introduction Analytical Techniques Buck Converter Boost Converter Buck-Boost Converter SPICE Analysis of SMPS
287 287 289 290 292 294
INDEX
Circuit Analysis: Port Point of View
1.1. INTRODUCTION Electronic devices are described by their nonlinear terminal voltage-current characteristics. Circuits containing electronic devices are analyzed and designed either by utilizing graphs of experimentally measured characteristics or by linearizing the voltage-current characteristics of the devices. Depending upon applicability, the latter approach involves the formulation of either small-perturbation equations valid about an operating point or a piecewise-linear equation set. The linearized equation set describes the circuit in terms of its interconnected passive elements and independent or controlled voltage and current sources; formulation and solution require knowledge of the circuit analysis and circuit reduction principles reviewed in this chapter.
CIRCUIT ELEMENTS
The time-stationary (or constant-value) elements of Fig. 1-1(a) to (c) (the resistor, inductor, and capacitor, respectively) are called passive elements, since none of them can continuously supply energy to a circuit. For voltage v and current i, we have the following relationships: For the resistor, v Ri or i Gv 1:1 where R is its resistance in ohms (), and G  1=R is its conductance in siemens (S). Equation (1.1) is known as Ohm s law. For the inductor, di 1 t v L or i v d 1:2 dt L 1 where L is its inductance in henrys (H). For the capacitor, t 1 dv i d or i C v C 1 dt
1:3
where C is its capacitance in farads (F). If R, L, and C are independent of voltage and current (as well as of time), these elements are said to be linear: Multiplication of the current through each by a constant will result in the multiplication of its terminal voltage by that same constant. (See Problems 1.1 and 1.3.) 1
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