Copyright 2001 by McGraw-Hill, Inc. Click Here for Terms of Use. in .NET

Create QR Code 2d barcode in .NET Copyright 2001 by McGraw-Hill, Inc. Click Here for Terms of Use.

Copyright 2001 by McGraw-Hill, Inc. Click Here for Terms of Use.
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1. An extensive collection of prewritten tools, called controls. These controls are accessible as icons within a graphical programming environment for creating customized windows components (e.g., menus, dialog boxes, text boxes, slide bars, etc.).
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INTRODUCING VISUAL BASIC
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Objects:
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Forms and controls are referred to collectively as objects. Most objects are associated with events; hence, objects may include their own unique event procedures. Objects are also associated with their own properties and methods (see below).
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Properties: Objects include properties that generally define their appearance or behavior. The choice of properties depends on the type of object. For example, the name, caption, height, width, background color, location and font are some of the more common properties associated with a command button. Methods: Some objects also include special program statements called methods. A method brings about some predefined action affecting the associated object. For example, show is a method that can be used with a hidden form to make it visible.
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Fig. 1.1 A form containing three controls
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1.4 THE VISUAL BASIC PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT PROCESS In general terms, the process of writing a Visual Basic program consists of several steps. They are: 1. 2. Decide what the program is supposed to do. Be as specific as possible. (Remember, however, that you may change your mind, perhaps several times, before you are finished.) Create a user interface, using Visual Basic s program development tools. This generally involves two related activities: (a) Draw the controls within their respective forms. (b) Define the properties of each control. 3. Write the Visual Basic instructions to carry out the actions resulting from the various program events. This generally involves writing a group of commands, called an event procedure, for each control (though certain controls, such as labels, do not have event procedures associated with them). Run the program to verify that it executes correctly. Repeat one or more steps if the results are incorrect, or if the program does not respond as you had intended.
4. 5.
Be prepared to carry out several cycles before you re satisfied with the final result. Remember that computer programming is a detailed, creative process that requires patience, skill and ingenuity. At times the program development process can become frustrating (as, for example, when your program does not execute correctly, or it does not execute at all because of hidden, hard-to-find programming errors). At such times it is often best to take a break, set your work aside for a while, and come back to it later.
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INTRODUCING VISUAL BASIC
1.5 REQUIRED COMPUTER SKILLS In order to use Visual Basic and derive some benefit from this book, you should have some proficiency in all of the following: 1. Familiarity with one of the Microsoft Windows operating systems (e.g., Windows 2000/98/95/NT, etc.). In particular: (a) Entering windows. (b) Using a mouse. (c) Accessing an application (specifically, Visual Basic). (d) Leaving windows. (e) Getting on-line help. 2. 3. Managing files within Windows (locating files, opening files, editing files, saving files, copying files, moving files, deleting files, etc.). Installing new applications (in case Visual Basic has not already been installed, or needs to be reinstalled).
We will not discuss these issues further it is assumed that you already have the requisite skills. We will, however, discuss file management within Visual Basic later in this book, as the need arises.
1.6 LOGICAL PROGRAM ORGANIZATION Virtually all nontrivial computer programs involve three major tasks. They are: 1. 2. 3. Entering input data (supplying information to be processed). Computing the desired results (processing the input data). Displaying the results (displaying the results of the computation.
Each step may be complex; its implementation may therefore require considerable time and effort. In Visual Basic, the first and last steps (data input and data output) are accomplished through the user interface. Thus, it is important to design a user interface that will accept input data and display output in a manner that is logical and straightforward for the particular application at hand. In many applications, the design of the user interface is the most complicated part of the entire program development process, though the controls built into Visual Basic simplify this process considerably. The second step (computation) is usually carried out by a series of Visual Basic instructions, embedded in one or more independent event procedures. The selection and order of these Visual Basic instructions are determined by an appropriate algorithm, i.e., a logical and orderly computational strategy for transforming the given input data into the desired output data. In many realistic applications, this step (i.e., the implementation of the algorithm) can be very complicated, challenging the abilities of very skilled programmers.
1.7 VISUAL BASIC PROGRAM COMPONENTS In Visual Basic, a program is referred to as a project. Every Visual Basic project consists of at least two separate files a project file (whose extension is .vbp), and a form file (with extension .frm). Some projects include multiple form files and other types of files, such as class module (.cls) files, standard module (bas) files, resource (.res) files, and ActiveX control (.ocx) files. Thus, the development of a Visual Basic project involves keeping track of several different files, and accessing these files individually within the Visual Basic environment, as needed.
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