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Organization of the Book The book is organized into six sections. Each of these sections contains multiple chapters. The last section has the references followed by the glossary. Each section of the book deals with one subject matter. Following are brief descriptions of contents of the various sections of the book and the chapters that they contain.
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Part I: Introduction
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This section contains two chapters.
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1: Introduction to the Book This chapter provides a brief descrip-
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tion of the reasons for writing this book and as well points out the distinguishing features of the book. In addition, this chapter provides a summary of the various sections of the book.
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2: Basic Concepts and Overview The second chapter of Part I provides an overview of SOA-based enterprise integration. In this chapter, we describe the various terms and concepts used in the book. These terms and concepts include service, distributed computing, integration, enterprise, enterprise software, loose coupling and code reuse, as well as service provider and service consumer. We also provide brief descriptions of all the technologies of distributed computing that contribute to and are embraced by SOA. In addition, we point out the evolutionary contributions to SOA made by different programming languages. Part II: Evolution of SOA-Based Integration
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In this section of the book, we trace the evolution of the various concepts that are basic to the SOA-based integration approach by studying some of the technologies that preceded SOA but are now part of SOA.
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3: Sockets and Data Sharing In this chapter, we study the various methods of data sharing between applications. These methods include data sharing through reading and writing to a file system, data sharing through a common database, and real-time data sharing through sockets. Sockets in particular introduced the idea of real-time connectivity between applications, which is fundamental to the working of almost all technologies that constitute SOA-based integration. However, raw sockets themselves do not allow functionality sharing between applications. 4: Remote Procedure Call (RPC) In 4, we describe the remote procedure call (RPC). RPC was an important step in the progress toward enterprise integration because it allowed, for the first time, functionality sharing between applications and specified all the basic
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Introduction to the Book
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steps for the sharing of functionality. In addition, RPC introduced the following new concepts and features:
The concept of interface declaration through the use of a speci cation le. The RPC speci cation le may be considered the rst step in the development of the services interface in today s world, such as a WSDL le. The concept of a service provider application (called the server) and the concept of a service consumer application (called the client). The server provides the implementation of one or more functions that can be used or invoked by the client application. The concept of the marshalling of arguments for transmission over the network. This refers to the packaging of arguments into one or more messages to be transmitted over the network. The encapsulation of all system- and network-related functionality in a library. This encapsulation led to future systems in which this functionality was separated out as a program of its own for the purpose of code reuse. The introduction of client and server stubs that shield the programmer from the system and network calls. The concept of platform independence via the use of external data representation (XDR), which encodes the data in a machine-independent form.
5: Object Request Broker (ORB)
In 5, we describe the Object Request Broker (ORB) technologies that form the backbone for all modern application servers, such as WebSphere Application Server and JBoss Application Server. In this chapter we start by moving away from procedural languages such as C and Fortran and into the realm of object-oriented programming using computer languages such as C++ and Java. We generalize the concepts of objects in object-oriented programming to distributed objects in which case the objects can reside on different computers connected by a network. Furthermore, we describe the CORBA method, which allows remote objects to interact with one another. In 5 we take a big step forward in application integration, by encapsulating the code for parameter marshalling and unmarshalling and the code for networking into a separate software component (or application). We call this component the Object Request Broker (ORB). This remediates the problem of the lack of code reuse in the case of RPC. Various implementations of ORB form the backbone of all the modern commercial application servers, which are needed to support distributed objects. In addition, ORB allows us to move away from point-to-point integration,
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