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Users can also check the status of the disks holding their individual user directories and files by using df. For example, this code will display the disk space usage for the disk on which the home directory exists for user pwatters:
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# df /staff/pwatters Filesystem kbytes used avail capacity /dev/md/dsk/d0 17398449 12889146 4335319 75%
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The following code checks the size of the partition on which the temporary mailbox for the user pwatters was created by the elm mail-reading program. This is a good thing to check if you intend to send a lot of e-mail messages!
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Managing Devices
Another way of obtaining disk space usage information with more directory-bydirectory detail is by using the /usr/bin/du command. This command prints the sum of the sizes of every file in the current directory and performs the same task recursively for any subdirectories. The size is calculated by summing all of the file sizes in the directory, where the size for each file is rounded up to the nearest 512-byte block. For example, taking a du of the /etc directory looks like this:
# cd /etc # du 14 ./default 7 ./cron.d 6 ./dfs 8 ./dhcp ... 2429 .
Thus, /etc and all of its subdirectories contain a total of 2,429 512-byte blocks of data. Of course, this kind of output is fairly verbose and is probably not much use in its current form.
Command Reference
The following commands are commonly used for managing and installing file systems.
The /etc/path_to_inst File
A list of mappings between physical devices to instance names is always kept in the /etc/path_to_inst file. The following example reviews the device to instance name mapping for a SCSI-based SPARC system:
"/sbus@1f,0" 0 "sbus" "/sbus@1f,0/sbusmem@2,0" 2 "sbusmem" "/sbus@1f,0/SUNW,fas@2,8800000" 1 "fas" "/sbus@1f,0/SUNW,fas@2,8800000/ses@f,0" 1 "ses" "/sbus@1f,0/SUNW,fas@2,8800000/sd@1,0" 16 "sd" "/sbus@1f,0/SUNW,fas@2,8800000/sd@0,0" 15 "sd" "/options" 0 "options" "/pseudo" 0 "pseudo"
You can see entries for the network interface /sbus@1f,0/SUNW,hme@2,8c00000, as well as the floppy disk /sbus@1f,0/SUNW,fdtwo@f,1400000 and the SBUS sbus@1f,0. For a PCI local bus based system such as a Sun Blade 100, the output would look like this:
"/pci@1f,0" 0 "pcipsy" "/pci@1f,0/isa@7" 0 "ebus"
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"/pci@1f,0/isa@7/power@0,800" 0 "power" "/pci@1f,0/isa@7/dma@0,0" 0 "isadma" "/pci@1f,0/isa@7/dma@0,0/parallel@0,378" 0 "ecpp" "/pci@1f,0/isa@7/dma@0,0/floppy@0,3f0" 0 "fd" "/pci@1f,0/isa@7/serial@0,2e8" 1 "su" "/pci@1f,0/isa@7/serial@0,3f8" 0 "su" "/pci@1f,0/pmu@3" 0 "pmubus" "/pci@1f,0/pmu@3/i2c@0" 0 "smbus" "/pci@1f,0/pmu@3/i2c@0/temperature@30" 0 "max1617" "/pci@1f,0/pmu@3/i2c@0/card-reader@40" 0 "scmi2c" "/pci@1f,0/pmu@3/i2c@0/dimm@a0" 0 "seeprom" "/pci@1f,0/pmu@3/fan-control@0" 0 "grfans" "/pci@1f,0/pmu@3/ppm@0" 0 "grppm" "/pci@1f,0/pmu@3/beep@0" 0 "grbeep" "/pci@1f,0/ebus@c" 1 "ebus" "/pci@1f,0/usb@c,3" 0 "ohci" "/pci@1f,0/usb@c,3/mouse@2" 0 "hid" "/pci@1f,0/usb@c,3/keyboard@4" 1 "hid" "/pci@1f,0/firewire@c,2" 0 "hci1394" "/pci@1f,0/ide@d" 0 "uata" "/pci@1f,0/ide@d/dad@0,0" 0 "dad" "/pci@1f,0/ide@d/sd@1,0" 0 "sd" "/pci@1f,0/sound@8" 0 "audiots" "/pci@1f,0/SUNW,m64B@13" 0 "m64" "/pci@1f,0/network@c,1" 0 "eri" "/pci@1f,0/pci@5" 0 "pci_pci" "/options" 0 "options" "/SUNW,UltraSPARC-IIe@0,0" 0 "us" "/pseudo" 0 "pseudo"
You can see that all the sbus entries have been replaced by the pci entries and that the network interface is no longer a hme, but an eri ( /pci@1f,0/network@c,1 0 eri ). In addition, some completely new types of hardware, such as a smart-card reader ( /pci@1f,0/pmu@3/i2c@0/card-reader@40 0 scmi2c ), are also available.
dmesg
The dmesg command is often used to determine whether specific device drivers for network interfaces and mass-storage devices have been correctly loaded at boot time. While its functions have largely been taken over by the syslog daemon (syslogd), dmesg provides a useful record of error and status messages printed by the kernel. When the system boots, several status messages of log level kern.notice will be recorded and can be subsequently retrieved by using dmesg:
Jan 15 14:23:16 austin genunix: [ID 540533 kern.notice] SunOS Release 5.10 Version Generic_108528-06 64-bit Jan 15 14:23:16 austin genunix: [ID 784649 kern.notice] Copyright
Part IV:
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1983-2001 Sun Microsystems, Inc. All rights reserved. Jan 15 14:23:16 austin genunix: [ID 678236 kern.info] Ethernet address = 0:3:ba:4:a4:e8 Jan 15 14:23:16 austin unix: [ID 389951 kern.info] mem = 131072K (0x8000000) Jan 15 14:23:16 austin unix: [ID 930857 kern.info] avail mem = 121085952
You can see that a 64-bit kernel has been loaded successfully, for SunOS 5.10 (Solaris 10). Sun s copyright banner is also recorded, along with the Ethernet address of the primary network interface card (0:3:ba:4:a4:e8), the amount of installed RAM, and the amount of currently available RAM after the kernel has been loaded. Before the kernel begins loading device drivers, it performs an integrity check to determine whether any naming conflicts exist. If a conflict is found, it is logged for future reference and action:
May 15 14:23:16 austin genunix: [ID 723599 kern.warning] WARNING: Driver alias "cal" conflicts with an existing driver name or alias.
You can see that the device driver alias cal has been used more than once, giving rise to a naming conflict. Next, details about the system architecture and its main bus type are displayed:
Jan 15 14:23:16 austin rootnex: [ID 466748 kern.info] root nexus = Sun Blade 100 (UltraSPARC-IIe) Jan 15 14:23:16 austin rootnex: [ID 349649 kern.info] pcipsy0 at root: UPA 0x1f 0x0 Jan 15 14:23:16 austin genunix: [ID 936769 kern.info] pcipsy0 is / pci@1f,0 Jan 15 14:23:16 austin pcipsy: [ID 370704 kern.info] PCI-device: pmu@3, pmubus0 Jan 15 14:23:16 austin pcipsy: [ID 370704 kern.info] PCI-device: ppm@0, grppm0 Jan 15 14:23:16 austin genunix: [ID 936769 kern.info] grppm0 is /pci@1f,0/pmu@3/ppm@0
You can see that the system is a Sun Blade 100 and that its PCI bus architecture has been correctly identified. The next stage involves identifying the hard drives attached to the system, as follows:
Jan 15 14:23:27 austin pcipsy: [ID 370704 kern.info] PCI-device: ide@d, uata0 Jan 15 14:23:27 austin genunix: [ID 936769 kern.info] uata0 is /pci@1f,0/ide@d
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