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In this chapter, we have examined some of the key concepts that underlie the Solaris 10 Operating Environment and the SunOS 5.10 Operating System. From the kernel to the shell to different file system types, Solaris 10 provides a number of sophisticated methods for managing systems and deploying applications in the enterprise. We have also examined the basic hardware support for systems that run the Solaris 10 Operating Environment and the SunOS 5.10 Operating System. From SPARC-based systems, specifically designed for Solaris with a mature 64-bit architecture, to the ubiquitous Intel-based systems that can now run Solaris Intel, the range of servers and workstations is enormous. Given Sun s efforts in presenting a unified desktop and office suite, many more systems will run Solaris in the future.
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olaris 10 provides more installation methods than any previous version. These include the Web Start Wizard, JumpStart, suninstall, and Live Upgrade. The Web Start Wizard is the easiest method for installing Solaris 10: it uses a GUI-based front end that presents a series of configuration choices. For those who prefer a command-line installation, the suninstall program is available. This is particularly useful for installing servers that are attached to a simple terminal on the console port, using the tip command, rather than a high-resolution monitor. Large organizations are more likely to create a JumpStart configuration to install a standard operating environment (SOE) on all Solaris 10 systems. Using JumpStart ensures that all systems have an identical installation base, which makes it easy for you to manage patches and maintain production systems. Live Upgrade is a new innovation that minimizes the downtime of production servers: a new boot environment is constructed while the server is still operating under its existing operating environment release. Once the second boot environment has been installed, the system is quickly rebooted into the new operating environment, and the previous version is uninstalled in the background. In most cases, installing from a high-speed CD-ROM with a modern system will take around 30 minutes. However, JumpStart, Live Upgrade, and all network-based installations will be slower on a per-machine basis, since network bandwidth limits the data that can be transmitted from the install server to the install client.
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The basic process of installing Solaris remains the same, regardless of the installation method selected. A number of planning tasks must be performed prior to installation: 1. Choose the appropriate installation method: the Web Start Wizard, JumpStart, suninstall, or Live Upgrade. 2. Decide whether you want to upgrade an existing installation or perform a clean install of the operating system. If your system is currently running Solaris 7, 8, or 9, you can perform an upgrade. If your system is running Solaris 2.6 or earlier,
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Part I:
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Installation
or if it is not running Solaris at all, you need to perform a clean installation. An upgrade preserves many of the system settings from the previous installation and generally takes less time to complete than a completely new installation. If you are performing an upgrade, you should first back up the current system by using ufsdump or a similar method so that it can be restored in the event of an upgrade failure. 3. Analyze your existing hardware devices to determine whether Solaris 10 will run on your system without an upgrade. For example, Solaris 9 on SPARC would run with only 96MB of RAM; however, at least 128MB of RAM is required to run Solaris 10. To perform an upgrade installation, you would need to add RAM to an existing Solaris 9 system with only 96MB of RAM. 4. Determine whether your storage devices have sufficient capacity to install Solaris 10 and all required third-party applications. A complete Solaris 10 installation requires around 3GB of disk space. In addition, an amount of swap space equivalent to twice your physical memory should be factored into the sum, along with third-party and user disk space requirements. 5. Choose an appropriate installation medium. Possibilities include a JumpStart, CD-ROM, DVD-ROM, or net-based installation from a remotely mounted CDROM or DVD-ROM drive. For enterprises, it s often convenient to set up a single network server with a Network File System (NFS)-exported DVD-ROM or CD-ROM drive that is publicly available for mounting. In addition, enterprises might also choose a customized JumpStart installation, which also requires network access to a centralized boot server. Smaller organizations will almost certainly use a CD-ROM or DVD-ROM drive attached to the local system for installation. 6. Gather all of the necessary system configuration information. This includes the system hostname, IP address, subnet mask, name service type, name server IP address, default router IP address, time zone, locale, and proxy server IP address. These values, and when they are required, will be discussed in the Configuration section. By undertaking a comprehensive preinstallation review, you can ensure a successful installation. In addition to making a decision about the installation type and gathering basic system data, you need to understand the network context in which the system will operate. You can define the network context by answering several key questions: Will the system be networked If so, you will need an IP address, subnet mask, and default router (unless the system itself is intended to be a router). Will the system use the Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) If so, you will not need to supply an IP address, as a lease over an IP address will automatically be granted to you at boot time. However, you will need the IP address of the DHCP server to enable DHCP. Will the system use IPv6, the newest version of the Internet Protocol
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