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GASKETS 25.12
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FASTENING, JOINING, AND CONNECTING
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FIGURE 25.6 Retained stress for various gasket materials versus shape factor of the gasket. A, Asbestos fiber sheet; B, cellulose fiber sheet; C, cork-rubber.
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As the area free to bulge increases, the shape factor decreases, and the relaxation will increase as the retained stress decreases. Figure 25.6 depicts the effect of shape factor on the gasket s ability to retain stress. Note that the shape factor decreases with increasing thickness. Therefore, the gasket should be as thin as possible to reduce relaxation. It must be thick enough, however, to permit adequate conformity. The clamp area should be as large as possible, consistent with seating stress requirements. Often designers reduce gasket width, thereby increasing gasket clamping stress to obtain better sealing. Remember, however, that this reduction might decrease the gasket s shape factor, resulting in higher relaxation over time.
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25.6 ENVIRONMENTAL CONDITIONS
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Many environmental conditions and factors influence the sealing performance of gaskets. Flange design details, in particular, are most important. Design details such as number, size, length, and spacing of clamping bolts; flange thickness and modulus; and surface finish, waviness, and flatness are important factors. Application specifics such as the medium being sealed, as well as the temperatures and pressures involved, also affect the gasket s sealing ability.The material must withstand corrosive attack of the confined medium. In particular, flange bowing is a most common type of problem associated with the sealing of a gasketed joint. The amount of bowing can be reduced by reducing the bolt spacing. For example, if the bolt spacing were cut in half, the bowing would be reduced to one-eighth of its original value [25.7]. Doubling the flange thickness could also reduce bowing to one-eighth of its original value. A method of calculating the minimum stiffness required in a flange is available [25.8].
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Downloaded from Digital Engineering Library @ McGraw-Hill (www.digitalengineeringlibrary.com) Copyright 2004 The McGraw-Hill Companies. All rights reserved. Any use is subject to the Terms of Use as given at the website.
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GASKETS 25.13
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Different gasket materials and types require different surface finishes for optimum sealing. Soft gaskets such as rubber sheets can seal surface finishes in the vicinity of 500 microinches ( in), whereas some metallic gaskets may require finishes in the range of 32 in for best sealing. Most gaskets, however, will seal adequately in the surface finish range of 63 to 125 in, with 90 to 110 in being preferred.There are two main reasons for the surface finish differences: (1) The gasket must be able to conform to the roughness for surface sealing. (2) It must have adequate bite into the mating flange to create frictional forces to resist radial motion due to the internal pressure, thereby preventing blowout. In addition, elimination of the radial micromotion will result in maintaining the initial clampup sealing condition. Micromotion can result in localized fretting, and a leakage path may be created [25.9]. Because of the complexity that results from the wide variety of environmental conditions, some gaskets for specific applications will have to be designed by trial and error. Understanding Sec. 25.7 will enable a designer to minimize the chance for leaks. Since the factors are so complex, however, adherence to the procedure will not ensure adequate performance in all cases. When inadequate gasket performance occurs, gasket manufacturers should be contacted for assistance.
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25.7 GASKET DESIGN AND SELECTION PROCEDURE
25.7.1 Introduction The first step in the selection of a gasket for sealing in a specific application is to choose a material that is both chemically compatible with the medium being sealed and thermally stable at the operating temperature of the application. The remainder of the selection procedure is associated with the minimum seating stress of the gasket and the internal pressure involved. In these regards, two methods are proposed: the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Code method and the simplified method proposed by Whalen.
25.7.2 ASME Code Procedure The ASME Code for Pressure Vessels, Sec.VIII, Div. 1,App. 2, is the most commonly used design guide for gasketed joints. An important part of this code focuses on two factors: an m factor, called the gasket material factor, which is associated with the hydrostatic end force, and a y factor, which is the minimum seating stress associated with particular gasket material. The m factor is essentially a safety factor to increase the clamping load to such an amount that the hydrostatic end force does not unseat the gasket to the point of leakage. The factors were originally determined in 1937, and even though there have been objections to their specific values, these factors have remained essentially unchanged to date. The values are only suggestions and are not mandatory. This method uses two basic equations for calculating required bolt load, and the larger of the two calculations is used for design. The first equation is associated with Wm2 and is the required bolt load to initially seat the gasket: Wm2 = bGy (25.2)
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