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nately, customers still have to be burdened with the installation of microfilters, and coupled noise on POTS is higher than expected. Many vendors argue that these problems largely disappear with full-feature ADSL using splitters; a truck dispatch is still required, but again, it is often required to install the microfilters anyway, so there is no net loss. Furthermore, a number of major semiconductor manufacturers support both G.lite and ADSL on the same chipset, so the decision to migrate from one to the other is a simple one that does not necessarily involve a major replacement of internal electronics.
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DSL technology offers advantages to both the service provider and the customer. The service provider benefits from successful DSL deployment because it serves not only as a cost-effective technique for satisfying the bandwidth demands of customers in a timely fashion, but also because it provides a Trojan horse approach to the delivery of certain preexisting services. As we noted earlier, many providers today implement T1 and E1 services over HDSL because it offers a cost-effective way to do so. Customers are blissfully unaware of the fact; in this case, it is the service provider rather than the customer who benefits most from the deployment of the technology. From a customer point-of-view, DSL provides a cost-effective way to buy medium-to-high levels of bandwidth and, in some cases, embedded access to content.
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The greatest challenges facing those companies looking to deploy DSL are competition from cable and wireless, pent-up customer demand, installation issues, and plant quality. Competition from cable and wireless companies represents a threat to wireline service providers on several fronts. First, cable modems enjoy a significant amount of press and, therefore, are gaining well-deserved market share; in fact, more than 65 percent of the broadband installed base today is delivered via cable modems, not via DSL. The service they provide, for the most part, is well received and offers high-quality, highspeed access. Wireless, on the other hand, is a slumbering beast. It has largely been ignored as a serious competitor for data transport, but the wild success of Wi-Fi, EV-DO, and CDMA-1x solutions have pushed wireless into the limelight.
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Downloaded from Digital Engineering Library @ McGraw-Hill (www.digitalengineeringlibrary.com) Copyright 2004 The McGraw-Hill Companies. All rights reserved. Any use is subject to the Terms of Use as given at the website.
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The second challenge is unmet customer demand. If DSL is to satisfy the broadband access requirements of the marketplace, it must be made available throughout ILEC service areas. This means that incumbent providers must equip their central offices with DSLAMs that will provide the line-side redirect required at the initial stage of DSL deployment. The law of primacy is evident here: The ILECs must get to market first with broadband offerings if they are to achieve and keep a place in the burgeoning broadband access marketplace. The third and fourth challenges to rapid and ubiquitous DSL deployment are installation issues and plant quality. A significant number of impairments have proven to be rather vexing for would-be deployers of widespread DSL. These challenges fall into two categories: electrical disturbances and physical impairments. While solutions have been crafted for most of these, they still pop up occasionally as vexing problems.
Electrical Disturbances
The primary cause of electrical disturbance in DSL is crosstalk, caused when the electrical energy carried on one pair of wires bleeds over to another pair and causes interference (noise) there. Crosstalk exists in several flavors. Near-end crosstalk (NEXT) occurs when the transmitter at one end of the link interferes with the signal received by the receiver at the same end of the link, while far-end crosstalk (FEXT) occurs when the transmitter at one end of the circuit causes problems for the signal received by a receiver at the far end of the circuit. Similarly, problems can occur when multiple DSL services of the same type exist in the same cable and interfere with one another. This is referred to as self-NEXT or self-FEXT. When different flavors of DSL interfere with one another, the phenomenon is called foreign-NEXT or foreign-FEXT. Other problems that can cause errors in DSL, and therefore a limitation in the maximum achievable bandwidth of the system, are simple radio frequency interference (RFI) that can find its way into the system; and impulse, Gaussian, and random noise that exist in the background but can affect signal quality even at extremely low levels.
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