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This is the easiest of all the phases. Programming itself is straightforward and tedious work, requiring attention to detail more than anything else. Seldom has a game failed solely because the programmer lacked the requisite programming skills. Games have failed to live up to their potential because the programmer did not expend enough effort, or rushed the job, or didn t bother to write in assembly language, but in few cases has talent or lack of it been the crucial factor in the programming of a game; rather, effort or lack of it is most often the responsible factor. If you place all of your self-respect eggs in the programming basket, I suggest that you get out of game design and work in systems programming. Otherwise, write the code and debug it.
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Ideally, playtesting is a process that yields information used to polish and refine the game design. In practice, playtesting often reveals fundamental design and programming problems that require major efforts to correct. Thus, playtesting is often interwoven with a certain amount of program debugging. Sometimes playtesting reveals that the game is too seriously flawed to save. A nonfatal, correctable flaw is usually a matter of insufficiency or excess: not enough color, too many pieces, not enough action, too much computation required of the player. A fatal flaw arises from a fundamental conflict between two important elements of the game whose incompatibility was not foreseen.
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You must have the courage to trash a game with such a fatal flaw. Patching after the game is programmed can only achieve limited gains; if the game is badly deformed, abortion is preferable to surgery. If playtesting reveals serious but not fatal problems, you must very carefully weigh your options. Do not succumb to the temptation to fall back on a quick and dirty patch job. Many times the problem that is discovered in playtesting is really only a symptom of a more fundamental design flaw. Be analytical; determine the essence of the problem. Once you have determined the true nature of the problem, take plenty of time to devise a variety of solutions. Don t rush this process; sometimes the ideal solution comes from an unexpected angle. Choose a solution for its promise of furthering the faithfulness of the game to your goals. Do not opt for the easiest solution, but the solution that best meets your goals. For example, while designing EASTERN FRONT 1941, I ran into a severe problem with unit counts: there were far too many units for the player to control conveniently. After wasting much time trying to devise ways to shrink the map or directly reduce the number of units, I eventually stumbled upon zones of control, a standard wargaming technique that extends the effective size of a unit. The inclusion of zones of control in the game not only solved the unit count problem; it also made the logistics rules more significant and gave the game a richer set of strategies. I set out with the narrow goal of reducing the unit count, but I found an improvement with much broader implications. If your initial design was well-developed (or you are just plain lucky) the game will not face such crises; instead, the problems you will face will be problems of polish. All of the little things that make a game go will be out of tune, and the game will move like a drunken dinosaur instead of the lithe leopard you had envisioned. Tuning the game will take many weeks of work. For the short term you can scrimp on the tuning while you are working on other problems, for tuning the game requires delicate adjustments of all the game factors; any other changes will only throw off the tune. Therefore, defer final tuning work until the very end of the polishing stage. There are actually two forms of playtesting. The first is your own playtesting done in the final stages of debugging. The second form comes later when you turn over the game to other playtesters. The salient-difference between the two lies in the nature of the bugs exposed. Your own playtesting should reveal and eliminate all program bugs (arising from flaws in the program structure) and many of the game bugs (arising from flaws in the game structure). The game you give to the playtesters should be free of program bugs; they should discover only bugs in the game structure. There is no point in showing an incomplete game to playtesters, and indeed there is a danger in contaminating their objectivity by showing them a version of the game too early. But the time will come when you feel that the game is very close to completion, and your own stock of ideas for improvements is dwindling. This is the time to show the game to a few select playtesters.
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